Christian Charm School

place setting

Sometimes, the opportunity to observe etiquette is just out of reach. Or just impossible – Like my story from yesterday, for example… But on most occasions knowing the proper way to behave in social situations is useful and necessary.

Did you ever have the opportunity (or were forced to) attend any etiquette classes or programs while you were growing up?

You know the kind I mean: Balancing a book on your head. Learning how to sit like a lady (or gentleman). Learning which piece of silverware to use with each plate or dish.

But those classes ~ including the ones I took part in ~ were more than just about using the right fork. Those classes were designed to encourage grace, dignity, courteousness, and consideration of others as well as yourself.

I got a big kick out of the few classes I took part in during Junior High at my Christian school. It was fun participating in a luncheon that included a variety of courses, and pursuing conversation designed to entertain and enlighten. It’s been awhile since I stopped to think about them and how much I enjoyed them. And it probably only fed my strong attachment to the whole idea of “taking tea.”

So did you ever take any “charm” courses or lessons?

Wish you had? Wish you could? Wish your daughters could?

My friend Alyssa Avant, has written a Christian Charm School course for girls that includes both a leaders guide and student workbook that you as a parent, or someone who works with preteens and teenagers, should consider including in your teaching role!

The leaders guide is very user friendly and offers great tips and recommendations for presenting the information to the girls in your life. With suggestions for demonstrations and supplies, as well as tips for encouraging each girl to use the workbook successfully, you will find a lot of freedom for creativity and flexibility in your role as “teacher.”

The student workbook contains practical and thought-provoking exercises that any girl can work through. With prompts from a parent or teacher, a different perspective on the true meaning of “charm” can be discovered.

In a world where Beauty is relegated simply to one’s physical attributes (or lack thereof), anyone’s confidence in themselves ~ and their True Worth ~ is often tested and shaken. Alyssa’s Christian Charm School offers a clear foundation on the basis of REAL BEAUTY – and reminds each of us the value that God, our Creator, has placed upon us.

14 thoughts on “Christian Charm School”

  1. Never went to a charm school, but my sister tried to teach us etiquette growing up. Only she was bad at it.

    Do they have a charm school for boys?

  2. I haven’t ever seen anything designed specifically for boys anywhere. Alyssa’s ministry is geared towards women and girls, mothers and daughters, but that isn’t to say charm school for boys is needed. I think it’d probably have to be called something else for most boys to attend…

    Charm, Social Grace, and Etiquette are certainly becoming lost arts, aren’t they? It is sad. The more people look to themselves and making themselves happy, the less likely they are to be considerate of others, and that’s really sad!

  3. I never attended any sort of class but we were taught well by mum.

    Sunday lunch was a meal with all the courses, even when there were no guests
    To be late is to insult (it says what I was doing is more important than you and that I didn’t think you were important enough to plan ahead for little things that might crop up and delay me etc)

    I was appalled when at pathology a couple of weeks ago when I was waiting for my turn and dd was with me.
    There were 3 spare seats. A mum came in with her 2 sons, young about 5-8yo. They sat in them.
    An elderly lady came in. The mum immediately asked her youngest to move to her lap so the seat was available. Sounds good at this point. He looked at her, shook his head and went back to playing his computer game. 3 seconds passed before I then whisked dd onto my lap so the seat was available. All I got from her was a ‘yes mum’ *grin*
    My issues… mum had to ask, the boy didn’t know to. The boy then refused his mother. The mother allowed the disobedience.

    What has happened to our world?????????????

  4. Personally, I think that’s where being considerate of others and putting other before self has gone by the way side. Selfishness and rudeness come naturally; Manners and etiquette MUST be taught. Knowing the exact fork I must use with each course at a full-course meal is not something I have to practice often – but it’s nice to know for the rare occasion I need it. But its NOT as important as being considerate and showing respect for others… That is so sad!

  5. It is. We’ve had a serious schedule change at our house (for a variety of reasons) and I’m usually up at 4:30 am with my hubby. I’m usually asleep by 10 or 10:30, so I’m getting more sleep now than I used to believe it or not. LOL

  6. oh wow – you’re good!
    I keep trying to get up early. Hubby unfortunately hears my alarm before I do. He gets up, switches it off and get back to bed!! Then sometime between 7-8am I wake in horror!
    He never gets it either lol, so I need to come up with plan B!!

  7. I used to be a stay up late – try to sleep in kinda of SAHM, but that didn’t work either. The nights I’d stay up late met early morning girls and I was really running on low. Getting up early with my hubby now has made a big difference in the amount of sleep I get and my attitude is improving, too. =) Not to mention I can accomplish much more in the few hours before my girls wake up. Sometimes I nap with them in the afternoon – a 20 minute power nap does WONDERS!

  8. This is interesting. Growing up with my mother was MY Christian charm school! But having a prompt/curriculum like this sure could come in handy. And in our world where courtesy, manners and just plain couth are rare – what a great idea!

  9. Some people still see the importance of these skills – and that’s why Alyssa put together this guide & workbook. Having some help introducing the information to kids who may have never even heard of good manners is a great idea!

  10. Sounds like a class I would have enjoyed as a teen!

    My parents taught us manners. The boys were taught to open doors for the girls (and I had to sit in the car and wait for them to open my door and I hated it) and we girls had to learn to wait for the boys to open the car doors, building doors, and to pull our chairs out.

    They taught us by example too, of course. Table manners, taught the boys to rise and offer their chairs to a woman, etc.

    We have taught our boys manners too. My oldest opened the door for a woman once and she gave him a dirty look and said she could do it herself, but otherwise, most of them thank him.

  11. the dirty look comment made me think

    Often we can ‘untrain’ others to show courtesy.

    I am careful to vocally thank any gentleman that holds a door for me – and not in an embarrassed under my breath kind of way. A nod of the head and in the same voice I’d say hello to a friend I hadn’t expected to run into.
    Seriously, a man grows a couple of inches in height when thanked for such courtesy’s.

    So not only must we teach our children, we must encourage others that hold these values.

  12. momstheword – its sad when ANYONE does not appreciate courtesy!

    Great point Mrs B! Showing appreciation for courtesy can go a long way…

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